Dr Michelle L. Bonati

PhD(Ill)

Honorary Associate

Email:

Phone: +61 2 9351 6384

Fax: +61 2 9351 5027

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Keywords

inclusive education, intellectual disability, service-learning, transition to postsecondary education



Professional biography

Dr. Michelle L. Bonati is an Assistant Professor in Education at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh and an Honorary Associate in Special and Inclusive Education, Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. She earned her Ph.D. in Special Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. Her research interests include examining service-learning as a context for developing inclusive K-12 schools, universities, and communities. Within this teaching method, she examines the interactions of persons with and without disability, focusing on processes that facilitate and inhibit access to the general curriculum, reciprocal peer relationships, and valued roles of individuals with complex support needs. 



Awards

  • 2017 Excellence in Teaching Award, Sydney School of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia



Current projects

  • Bonati, M. L. (PI). (2019). Amplifying children’s voices within arts-based service-learning: Emerging inclusive education practices in Indonesia. Department of State/Educational and Cultural Affairs Research Fellowship ($6,000). The American Institute for Indonesian Studies and the Council for American Overseas Research Centers.


Selected publications

Book chapters

  • Bonati, M. (2019). Social Justice and Students with Intellectual Disability: Inclusive Higher Education Practices. In K. Freebody, S. Goodwin & H. Proctor (Ed.), Higher Education, Pedagogy and Social Justice: Politics and Practice (pp. 207–224), Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • O'Brien, P., Bonati, M., Gadow, F. & Slee, R. (2019). Moving from rhetoric to reality: Inclusive tertiary education for adults with intellectual disability. In P. O’Brien, M. L. Bonati, F. Gadow & R. Slee (Ed.), People with Intellectual Disability Experiencing University Life (pp. 277–287), Leiden and Boston: Brill.
  • Bonati, M., Chapman, B., Stenberg, J., Towers, L. & Werkhoven, T. (2019). Lecturers' Perspectives on Being Involved in Teaching Students with Intellectual Disability Participating in University Courses. In P. O’Brien, M. L. Bonati, F. Gadow & R. Slee (Ed.), People with Intellectual Disability Experiencing University Life (pp. 205–216), Leiden and Boston: Brill.
  • Bonati, M. (2019). Inclusive tertiary education through universal design for learning and service-learning. In P. O’Brien, M. L. Bonati, F. Gadow & R. Slee (Ed.), People with Intellectual Disability Experiencing University Life (pp. 243–254), Leiden and Boston: Brill.
  • O'Brien, P. & Bonati, M. (2019). From institutionalisation to inclusion. In P. O’Brien, M. L. Bonati, F. Gadow & R. Slee (Ed.), People with Intellectual Disability Experiencing University Life (pp. 3–19), Leiden and Boston: Brill.
  • Bonati, M. (2017). Post-school social inclusion for adults with Autism in Australia. In C. Little (Ed.), Supporting Social Inclusion for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from Research and Practice (pp. 100–114), Abingdon: Routledge.

Journal articles

  • Hosshan, H., Stancliffe, R., Villeneuve, M. & Bonati, M. (2020). Inclusive schooling in Southeast Asian countries: a scoping review of the literature . Asia Pacific Education Review, 21(1), 99–119. DOI:10.1007/s12564-019-09613-0
  • Bonati, M. & Dymond, S. K. . (2019). Service-learning and students with severe disabilities: Examining participation and curricular goals . Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 57(1), 42–55. DOI:10.1352/1934-9556-57.1.42
  • Bonati, M. (2018). Collaborative planning: Cooking up an inclusive service-learning project. Education and Treatment of Children, 41(1), 139–151. DOI:10.1353/etc.2018.0005
  • Mann, J. A., Dymond, S. K., Bonati, M. & Neeper, L. S. (2015). Restrictive citizenship: Civic-oriented service-learning opportunities for all students. The Journal of Experiential Education, 38(1), 56–72. DOI:10.1177/1053825913514731