Associate Professor Angela Brew

BA(Hons)(Wales), MA(Sus), PhD(Bath)

Honorary Associate Professor

Email:

Phone: + 61 2

Fax: +61 2 9351 2606

Building.Room: A35.

Professional biography

Dr Angela Brew is an  internationally renowned as a researcher and speaker and has worked in the UK and in Australia in the area of higher education for over thirty years. Her research on the nature of research and human knowing and its relationship to teaching has been published widely. Her books include: "The Nature of Research: Inquiry in Academic Contexts"; "Research and Teaching: beyond the divide"; and, most recently, "Transforming a University: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Practice." From 1999-2003 she was President of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA). She is  an elected Fellow of the Society for Research into Higher Education and a Fellow of the Staff and Educational Development Association (UK).



Awards

  • 2010  - Senior Fellowship, Staff and Educational Development Association (UK)

  • 2010 - Appointed Visiting Professor, University of Gloucestershire, UK

  • 2009  - Honorary Associate Professor, University of Sydney

  • 2009 - Awarded HERDSA Life Membership

  • 2009  -  Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) National Teaching Fellow

  • 2008 - Elected a Fellow of the Society for Research into Higher Education (FSRHE)      

  •  1994 - Fellowship of the Staff and Educational Development Association



Current projects

  • 1. Undergraduate research [Brew, Popenici, Hajdarpasic & Mantai]. The extent to which students are aware of research. The aim of the project is to investigate the perceptions of research of the University’s undergraduate students. It explores their ideas about what research is and the extent to which they are aware of research in the university. Further it examines their experiences of research and their attitudes to the benefits of university research. It also explores their views on the relevance of research to their future working lives. Visibility of research across campus. This project is designed to answer the question of how visible research is to students across the campus. This research is designed to be carried out by taking photographs of “research” as it is visible on campus. This includes posters and messages on noticeboards in corridors, signs, and other indications e.g. people in white coats that are visible on campus. A semiotic analysis is then planned to determine what messages about research are given to students. Examine barriers and challenges in relation to undergraduate research. In order to remove barriers to the implementation of undergraduate research it is important to investigate what they are. Interviews will be carried out with heads of department and focus groups of academics. The extent to which research is currently embedded in curricula Reviews will be based on a content analysis of unit of study (course) outlines. This project will provide a benchmark for measuring developments. The Research Skills Development Framework (RSD) will be used to map the extent to which research skills are progressively being developed in a coordinated manner across the curriculum. Investigation of the outcomes of undergraduate research experience programs This project is designed to investigate the views of coordinators of undergraduate research experience programs concerning the value and outcomes of such programs; and begin to investigate how undergraduate students respond to such programs, what they believe they gain and how they intend to use what they have gained. The project is funded by Macquarie University
  • 2. The Formation of Academics as Researchers and Teachers [Brew, Boud, Lucas and Crawford] The aim of this project is to investigate how academics are formed as researchers and as teachers. Specifically it examines how academics in different disciplines and different research-intensive university environments think about and act upon the perceived constraints and opportunities for development in their context? It investigates how these academics come to position themselves in relation to research and teaching? What has influenced this positioning? Specifically the research is examining how mid-career academics, i.e. how those with 5-10 year’s’ experience beyond their doctorate or first appointment and in different disciplines and different research-intensive university environments in Australia and the UK think about and act upon the perceived constraints and opportunities for development in their context and how these academics come to position themselves in relation to research and teaching? What has influenced this positioning?
  • 3. Building local leadership for research education [Boud, Solomon, McKenzie, Brew, Malfroy, Kiley] Leadership exists at various levels in doctoral education. Central units responsible for research education (often a graduate school) are well established and their role understood in many institutions. Research supervisors provide leadership and this has been a growing area of study. A third and important level of leadership, and one that is less well recognised and understood lies between the research supervisors and the overall unit responsible for research education. There is considerable variation between universities in the ways in which these positions are conceived. This ALTC funded project is concerned to map the work that research education coordinators do and provide workshops, materials and resources to support and develop this work.


Current research students

Project title Degree Research student
The formation of academics’ epistemic stances PhD Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick